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dc.contributor.authorHarris, G. F.
dc.contributor.authorNiha, P. P.
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T03:52:37Z
dc.date.available2012-09-17T03:52:37Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationHarris, G. F., & Niha, P. P. (1999). Nga riwai Maori: Maori potatoes (Working Papers No. 2-99). Lower Hutt, New Zealand: The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11072/1195
dc.description.abstractIt is generally accepted by scholars that potatoes were first introduced to New Zealand in the late eighteenth century by Captain James Cook and the French explorer, Marion du Fresne. Further introductions from a variety of sources, including possible direct introductions from South America, followed into the nineteenth century. Maori were quick to recognise the advantages these new introductions had over the kumara (Ipomea batatas) and other traditional food sources. Potatoes soon became both a staple item in the Maori diet and a trade commodity. The various cultivars (cultivated varieties) were given Maori names and many of these early introductions are still grown by Maori today. These 'Maori potatoes' with their deep-set eyes, often knobbly irregular shape and colourful tubers, are quite distinct from modern potatoes and are known as Maori as riwai, taewa, parareka and mahetau.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Papers
dc.relation.ispartofseries"02-99"
dc.subjectMaori potatoes
dc.subjectRiwai
dc.subjectTaewa
dc.subjectMahetau
dc.subjectParareka
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectSolanum tuberosum subsp. andigena
dc.subject.other270400 Botany
dc.titleNga riwai: Maori potatoes.
dc.typeWorking Papers
opnz.bibliographicCitationThe Open Polytechnic of New Zealand
opnz.comformsToLower Hutt
opnz.createdEthical Statement: In conducting this research project the author has followed the principles of ethical conduct as stated by Ngahuia Te Awekotuku in 'He Tikanga Whakaaro -- Research Ethics in the M?ori Community' and in the 'Mataatua Declaration on Cultural Property and Intellectual Property Rights of Indignenous Peoples 1993'. It is recognised that some of the information in this paper is M%257;tauranga M?ori, and hence the aims of the study and the intention to publish the information were conveyed to the informants at the time the information was collected. Some of the plant material was given to the author on the understanding that it was not to be commercially exploited and was solely for the purposes of academic research. The author has applied this principle to all plant material and to all information gathered in the course of this study.


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